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Chili Dog MVP Press Box: News & Media

The Hall of Very Good Podcast: John Owens and Dr. David Fletcher

John Owens and Dr. David Fletcher, authors of Chili Dog MVP, join the boys to talk about the new book, their individual relationships with should-be Hall of Famer Dick Allen, his chances at making it to Cooperstown, the story behind the slugger’s “chili dog” game and the similarities between that 1972 Chicago White Sox team and the Bulls second three-peat.

Listen to the Podcast at HallOfVeryGood.libsyn.com…

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Chili Dog MVP Press Box: News & Media

Terry Forster interview with David Letterman: “Forster a ‘tub of goo'”

David Letterman interviews baseball player Terry Forster, at that time a member of the Atlanta Braves. Aired July 29, 1985.

[Letterman] insulted Forster as a “fat tub of goo” and Forster threatened to sue him, but then realized that he WAS a fat tub of goo. They reconciled, and Forster came on the program eating a bunch of hot dogs exuding self deprecating humor about his weight.

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This guy’s weight overshadowed the fact he was a very good reliever and quite athletic.

Daniel Zanier

I still use the phrase “Tub of Goo” to describe a fat pitcher. He was a great sport coming on the Letterman show.

Cali John

Not a good idea to piss off a champion pitcher. They have killer brains.

Janis Gay
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Chili Dog MVP Press Box: News & Media

The late Jack Brickhouse on how his Hey Hey HR call got started…Jack a major character in my chapters

The Chicago Baseball Museum is presenting classic interviews from the archives of CBM historian George Castle’s “Diamond Gems” syndicated weekly baseball radio show, which aired from 1994 to 2010.

This edition features one of four consecutive segments taken from a retrospective on the career of famed Chicago announcer Jack Brickhouse, taped in Aug. 1997. In this segment, Jack recalls how his famed “Hey Hey” home-run call came about around 1950, in the first years of televised baseball at Wrigley Field. Brickhouse had been using the call for homers by Cubs slugger Hank Sauer without realizing it. Brickhouse also will be honored this season with a bobblehead day at Wrigley Field as part of its 100th anniversary. The Chicago Baseball Museum supports the Brickhouse family in the promotional effort.

>> Listen to the interview at ChicagoBaseballMuseum.org…

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Chili Dog MVP Press Box: News & Media

The late Bart Johnson remembering Goose Gossage and Terry Forster

The Chicago Baseball Museum is presenting classic interviews from the archives of CBM historian George Castle’s “Diamond Gems” syndicated weekly baseball radio show, which aired from 1994 to 2010.

This edition features a 1998 interview with Bart Johnson, one of a trio of home-grown hard-throwers the White Sox produced at the dawn of the 1970s. Bart, nicknamed “Mr. Smoke,” recalls the start of his career and that of Hall of Famer Goose Gossage and lefty Terry Forster. Johnson went on to a three-decade-long run as a scout, thanks to support from Sox GM Roland Hemond.

We have a transcript of the interview. You can also listen to the interview at ChicagoBaseballMuseum.org…

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Chili Dog MVP Press Box: News & Media

Nancy Faust on how some of her trademark organ programs began

The Chicago Baseball Museum is presenting classic interviews from the archives of CBM historian George Castle’s “Diamond Gems” syndicated weekly baseball radio show, which aired from 1994 to 2010.

This edition features a 2007 interview with all-time White Sox organist Nancy Faust, on the 30th anniversary of her inauguration of “Na, Na, Na, Hey, Hey, Hey, Good-bye” as a kind of team anthem when opposing teams pulled their pitchers. Faust began playing the 1969 Steam one-hit wonder during a July 29-31, 1977 showdown series with the Kansas City Royals at old Comiskey Park.

>> Listen to the interview at ChicagoBaseballMuseum.org…

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Chili Dog MVP Press Box: News & Media

Harry Caray interviews Dick Allen in 1972

The Chicago Baseball Museum is presenting classic interviews from the archives of CBM historian George Castle’s “Diamond Gems” syndicated weekly baseball radio show, which aired from 1994 to 2010.

All-time baseball announcer Harry Caray conducted interviews in spring training 1972 in Florida and early in the season in Chicago. Two superstars who’d go on to earn honors in ’72 are queried: the White Sox’s Dick Allen, the eventual American League MVP, and the Phillies’ Steve Carlton, the National League’s Cy Young Award winner.

>> Listen to the interview at ChicagoBaseballMuseum.org…